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I'm Craig. I've got a wife and a kid and a far too familiar relationship with Tumblr's Reply button. I'm not as cool as you, but that's ok. I know you love me just the way I am.

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28 May 14


16 June 13
A lot of it has to do with, even though I was raised in the southern part of the state, anywhere in New Mexico has a feel of home to it. 

Santa Fe is the fourth largest city in the state, yet has less than 70,000 people and the sizes of towns drop off dramatically after that. No matter where you are, there is still a small town feel. 

The state itself is these small pockets of people surrounded by vast emptiness which, while harsh and barren, is beautiful. Santa Fe is certainly no exception to this.

Everything from the food to architecture to art to the culture is an amalgam of the various groups who live or have lived there: Spanish, Puebloan, Navajo, etc.

Then there is the underlying mythos of the west, something not seen often in our country. History can be found anywhere, but combining the legends of the untamed west and indigenous beliefs you find an area where reminders of that bygone era are everywhere and buildings can still be found with window frames painted turquoise, said to provide protection from evil.

A lot of it has to do with, even though I was raised in the southern part of the state, anywhere in New Mexico has a feel of home to it. Santa Fe is the fourth largest city in the state, yet has less than 70,000 people and the sizes of towns drop off dramatically after that. No matter where you are, there is still a small town feel.

The state itself is these small pockets of people surrounded by vast emptiness which, while harsh and barren, is beautiful. Santa Fe is certainly no exception to this.

Everything from the food to architecture to art to the culture is an amalgam of the various groups who live or have lived there: Spanish, Puebloan, Navajo, etc. Then there is the underlying mythos of the west, something not seen often in our country. History can be found anywhere, but combining the legends of the untamed west and indigenous beliefs you find an area where reminders of that bygone era are everywhere and buildings can still be found with window frames painted turquoise, said to provide protection from evil.
26 December 12
It really is fairly simple. I put heavy whipping cream (it needs to be very cold, so don’t leave it out to get to room temperature) into the bowl of the mixer and turn it up. No, really turn it up. Keep going and when it looks like you’ve made whipped cream, keep going past that. Eventually you’ll get very stiff whipped cream and after that, it will finally start to break. When it does, it starts to turn solid fast, and it usually does that around the time you think it’s never going to happen, so don’t be like me and get distracted with other things in the kitchen. If you do, you’ll also be like me and end up cleaning the buttermilk (which isn’t like buttermilk you buy in any way, because that’s actually cultured milk…very confusing) that gets sloshed around when the beater is suddenly just moving around a blob of solid butter  in a pool of liquid. It’s a mess.  Once it completely separates, take the solids out and put them on cheesecloth or paper towels to get rid of any moisture that’s left. You can even give it a press or squeeze to really make sure it’s all gone. After that, just put it into whatever container or shape you want. I just rolled it in wax paper this time, but other times I’ve used Tupperware and Melissa has even used turkey-shaped molds for Thanksgiving in the past. As for other ingredients, you can leave it as-is or add salt. Nothing else is really needed. Typically, salted butter is about 1-1.5% salt, so when I do add it (like I did this time), I attempt to be extremely scientific and throw in “some” when I start mixing. 

And that is how 32 ounces of heavy whipping cream ends up becoming about 13 ounces of butter. Does it taste any better or different than the stuff at the store? Oh, probably not, but it’s nice to do every once in a while.

It really is fairly simple. I put heavy whipping cream (it needs to be very cold, so don’t leave it out to get to room temperature) into the bowl of the mixer and turn it up. No, really turn it up. Keep going and when it looks like you’ve made whipped cream, keep going past that. Eventually you’ll get very stiff whipped cream and after that, it will finally start to break. When it does, it starts to turn solid fast, and it usually does that around the time you think it’s never going to happen, so don’t be like me and get distracted with other things in the kitchen. If you do, you’ll also be like me and end up cleaning the buttermilk (which isn’t like buttermilk you buy in any way, because that’s actually cultured milk…very confusing) that gets sloshed around when the beater is suddenly just moving around a blob of solid butter in a pool of liquid. It’s a mess. Once it completely separates, take the solids out and put them on cheesecloth or paper towels to get rid of any moisture that’s left. You can even give it a press or squeeze to really make sure it’s all gone. After that, just put it into whatever container or shape you want. I just rolled it in wax paper this time, but other times I’ve used Tupperware and Melissa has even used turkey-shaped molds for Thanksgiving in the past. As for other ingredients, you can leave it as-is or add salt. Nothing else is really needed. Typically, salted butter is about 1-1.5% salt, so when I do add it (like I did this time), I attempt to be extremely scientific and throw in “some” when I start mixing.

And that is how 32 ounces of heavy whipping cream ends up becoming about 13 ounces of butter. Does it taste any better or different than the stuff at the store? Oh, probably not, but it’s nice to do every once in a while.

21 September 12

anindependentguinevere said: What is your all-time favorite TV show and why?

This is difficult. Shows come and go, and what was once a favorite may stop being one after a while. I’ll give you two that have been favorites and that I will watch reruns of over and over.

1. Futurama - It’s hilarious and nerdy in all the right ways. The writers not only include references to all sorts of pop-culture, but some of them have advanced degrees in math or science. For an episode a couple of years ago, they actually wrote a complex mathematical proof to solve the problem the characters had. It also has an emotional core that they never forget.

2. Good Eats - I love food. I love to eat. I also love to make food and feed others. Alton Brown took the standard “stand and stir” cooking show and turned it completely upside down. He brought in skits, puppets, history, anthropology, science, humor and homages to all sorts of books, tv shows and movies. The show is entertaining, but is really education at heart. He saw himself as a teacher when he was making the show, and the amount I learn just from watching is amazing. The episode I always use as an example of just how different it is from every other cooking show and how effective he is at teaching is “American Slicer”. This episode is about knives. Not about a dish or an ingredient, just a knife. He goes from the very basics of how knives are made, to metallurgy and the composition of alloys to the basic knife functions like chop, pare and slice. He doesn’t mention any recipes. He just talks about how to use the knife. When he gets to the end of the show, all of a sudden, he takes the ingredients he’s been using the entire episode to demonstrate technique and shows that it’s the basis for a recipe. A couple other quick additions, including one new knife trick, and it’s a second recipe. It goes from technique to application in an instant in a way that no one else ever does. On top of all that, the show is always a lot of fun.

20 November 11
@anindependentguinevere: Not quite. Alabama. Mobile Bay on one side, Gulf on the other.

@anindependentguinevere: Not quite. Alabama. Mobile Bay on one side, Gulf on the other.

18 November 11
We were in Kentucky at the time, but my experience suggests that it describes every Cracker Barrel in every state.

We were in Kentucky at the time, but my experience suggests that it describes every Cracker Barrel in every state.

14 September 11
It’s Daily Crossword. I couldn’t tell you if it’s really any better than any other crossword app. I just got it because it was one of the free-app-a-day things a while back.

It’s Daily Crossword. I couldn’t tell you if it’s really any better than any other crossword app. I just got it because it was one of the free-app-a-day things a while back.

26 April 11
Look at TJ. Stuck being the token Y chromosome, like me at work…or me at home.

Look at TJ. Stuck being the token Y chromosome, like me at work…or me at home.

Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh